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PostPosted: Wed Jun 15, 2005 5:03 am 
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Joined: Sun Apr 21, 2002 2:03 am
Posts: 147
Location: Montreal Quebec
Now that I have Active sky I am getting a lot more turbulence in my little bonanza.

I was wondering if it is worse over water or more stable as the air temp should be the same or does the depth of the water greatly influences things.

In the same lines, say you fly to Comox, BC. from Vancouver.

You could fly over the mountains or stay more to the right and fly over water most of the trip. Would one be better than the other or do they equal themselves out.

Also if you have clouds at say 3000 and then 8000.
Would you try and fly under 3000 or between 3000 and 8000. (Keep in mind I would rather not fly over 8000.)



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PostPosted: Wed Jun 15, 2005 5:57 am 
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Joined: Sat Jul 13, 2002 4:56 am
Posts: 67
Location: Moose Jaw, SK
If VFR, you would stay below the clouds if able, or go around them...

You must maintain 500' of vertical separation from clouds...or anywhere from 1 mile to 2000' horizontal sep, depending on the class of airspace you are in. Technically, I guess if you get a big enough hole in the clouds, you could climb above them and maintain 500' sep that way, but you better hope for a hole when you need to come back down....lol

As far as turbulence over water/land...I'll leave that one to someone else. Ken?

Cheers!



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PostPosted: Wed Jun 15, 2005 8:07 am 
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Joined: Thu Dec 28, 2000 2:25 am
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Location: Vancouver
Generally flight over water is fairly stable. You are absolutely right, Ron, in assuming that the cool underlayer of water stabilizes the air above. On a rough day, I welcome any water under me, but here in B.C., that water can often be surrounded by mountains that can quickly mess that whole concept up.

The underlying concept is that surface temperature causes convection. I recall many pictures in flight training manuals depicting the effects of various geography on air currents. Freshly plowed fields = bad; grassy fields = good. As for mountains combined with the above, the best idea is to consider where the wind is coming from, and then consider the wind as you would water. What would water do flowing over the obstructions you see in front of you, and that is what you will find during your flight. As an aside, a pilot never wants to fly the center of a canyon. That is where downflows and upflows meet in a cacophony of turbulence. You want to look at the current winds and decide which side of the canyon will have the updrafts and then keep your wing almost in the trees on the good side. If you get hit by something, you will go up, not down, and that is a good thing, no? Sunny side is usually best since warm air ascends.



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